Trump Nominates Barrett as Supreme Court Justice Not Committing Himself to Peaceful Transfer of Power If He Loses

President Donald Trump on Saturday said he is nominating Amy Coney Barrett, a conservative federal appeals court judge, to succeed the late Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg on the US Supreme Court, setting off a fierce partisan battle in the waning days of a hotly contested presidential election, reported CNN.
Calling it a "very proud moment indeed," Trump called Barrett a woman of "towering intellect" and "unyielding loyalty to the Constitution" who would rule "based solely on the fair reading of the law."
In a flag-bedecked Rose Garden designed to mimic Ginsburg's own nomination ceremony in 1993, Trump recounted Barrett's educational and professional background, noted her seven children and hailed her ties to another late Supreme Court justice, Antonin Scalia, for whom she clerked.
Barrett, Trump declared before an audience that included Scalia's widow, Republican senators and several figures from the conservative media, is "one of our nation's most brilliant and gifted legal minds."
In her own remarks, Barrett offered only a glimpse of what type of justice she would be and did not delve into specifics.
The nomination comes at a critical time in history, as the President openly questions the integrity of the upcoming election and has not committed to a peaceful transfer of power in the event he loses. He's repeatedly said that the Supreme Court needed to have all nine seats filled ahead of Election Day, in case the court needed to weigh in on the legality of mail-in ballots being sent to Americans across the country amid the coronavirus pandemic. And several weighty cases loom on the immediate horizon, should she be confirmed as swiftly as Republicans hope, including one that could determine the fate of the Affordable Care Act.